• To help India maximise the benefits from the on-going tariff war between the US andChina, Commerce and Industry Minister Piyush Goyal has asked exporters to flagconcerns related to availability of land and labour, setting up of common effluenttreatment plants, cluster development and necessary logistics support in ports, airportsand customs.
  • Poor demand for the heavy commercial vehicle segment, which has witnessed
    subdued sales volumes since November 2018, is likely to linger for a longer period as
    the trucking sector will be up against a formidable challenger – Indian Railways’
    Dedicated Freight Corridors (DFCs) – in the years to come.
  • One commissioned, the DFC’s will offer freight rates that would be up to 45% cheaper
    compared with roads, and the time taken for delivery will almost be the same, further
    impacting the demand for heavy vehicles, whose demand is subdued on account of
    rise in prices and the revised axle load norms.
  • The former CMD, Concor, in his article suggested that the 2019-20 Budget for the
    Indian Railways (IR) indicates no light at the end of the tunnel. He further suggested
    that caught in a low growth trap, the organisation must revamp its structure rather than
    be content with business as usual.
  • IR to reorient its freight transportation strategy. It needs to calibrate its services to
    create critical mass of piecemeal wagons/containers, in partnership with other players,
    for timetabled multimodal logistics services end-to-end.
  • Its passenger services have likewise to stride ahead with faster, comfortable and
    punctual inter-city services. Among a daily average of over 13,300 passenger trains
    that the IR operates, there are 4,700 short-distance stopping ‘regional’ trains, including those serving towns by ferrying commuters to/from expanding cities and metros.
  • Power distribution companies would have to pay the agreed full tariff to renewable
    energy producers during the period of non-supply of electricity, the government said.
    Power discoms pay fixed charges or infrastructure cost to electricity generation
    companies during the non-supply period under the power purchase agreements (PPA).
  • India’s coal-fired power generation capacity is expected to rise by 22.4% in three years,
    the federal power ministry’s chief engineer said.
  • India saw its annual coal demand rise 9.1% to nearly 1 billion tonnes in the year ended
    March 2019.
  • “Capacity by 2022 is likely to be 238 gigawatts (GW) in terms of coal-based
    generation,” Ghanshyam Prasad, chief engineer at India’s ministry of power said.
    The International Energy Agency expects India to become the second largest coal
    consumer behind China early next decade.
  • Electricity demand in the country rose 36% in the seven years to April 2019 while coal-
    fired generation capacity during the period grew by 74% to 194.44 GW, according to
    the Central Electricity Authority (CEA).
  • India’s power consumption has slowed to 3.6% during the year ended March 2019, the
    fourth straight fiscal year of decline, according to the CEA.
  • State-run NTPC Ltd wants to increase its coal-fired capacity to 85 GW by 2032 from
    47.3 GW currently, S.D. Prasad, chief general manager at NTPC, said.
  • In the first ‘Pragati’ review meeting of his second term in office, Prime
    Minister Narendra Modi reiterated his government’s commitment for the “Housing for All
    by 2022” mission and urged bureaucrats to remove hurdles to achieve the objective.