• Vacuum Dewatered Cement Concrete (VDCC) roads, slip roads and 15 Cement Concrete (CC) roads will dot Secunderabad soon.  The Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation (GHMC) is also taking up construction of reinforced cement concrete drain in Moula Ali and restoration of 70-km of arterial roads in Secunderabad.
  • The average plant load factor (PLF) of thermal power generation units is on a decline in the country. At 57.61%, the PLF in January touched a five-year low. In 2019, the PLF witnessed double-digit slump in most months. The fall corresponds to a decline in electricity demand, which recorded just a 0.28% growth in the year, the lowest since 2014

  • The coal ministry has plans for a big push on the use of domestic coal through gasification process to produce chemicals like methanol and fertilisers like urea for industrial purposes by 2023-24, a senior official reported.
  • Coal gasification is the process of producing syngas, a mixture consisting carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), natural gas (CH4), and water vapour (H2O).
  • India‘s thermal coal imports rose 12.6% to nearly 200 million tonnes in 2019, government data showed, reflecting the second straight year of growth in shipments of the fuel despite attempts by the government to cut imports.
  • The buyout deals in real estate and infrastructure sectors were 2.5 times of other asset classes, said a new report by audit and consulting firm EY and the Indian Venture Capital & Private Equity Association (IVCA.)
  • In 2019, buyouts in real estate and infra were $11.6 billion while in other assets it stood at $4.6 billion. “While consistent growth in buyouts has been a major driver of the overall growth of PE/VC investments for the past three years, there was a slight difference in nature of the deals in 2019.
  • Responding to the longstanding industry demand of removing tariff caps in renewable energy auctions, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) has decided that “cap or upper ceiling tariff will not be prescribed in future bids”. The tariff cap was one of the reasons cited by the industry, which slowed down the pace of adding renewable generation capacities to 8.6 giga-watt (GW) in FY 19 from 11.3 GW and 11.8 GW in FY17 and FY18, respectively. The other reasons were devaluation of the rupee, rising finance costs.
  • The move to do away with the tariff cap reflects not only the increasing maturity of the sector but also the government’s belief that robust bidding processed will ensure tariffs remain at reasonable levels,” said Mr Sumant Sinha, CMD of ReNew Power.